My Life Changed Four Years Ago

344944_205061913_MediumMy life changed four years ago……my oldest son was getting ready to leave to the Air Force and I went for a run with him and sadly I could not even make it half way around a city block. I was embarrassed, I always tried to lead by example, I watch my weight, I do not smoke, do not drink, eat healthy and am very active, just was not able to run around a block and he did not let me live it down….lol. So that was the start of my running journey, I signed up for my first 5k and was instantly hooked. I have never looked back and only wish that I would have stumbled upon my love for running long ago. In the past 3 ½ years I have 2 full marathons, almost a dozen ½ marathons, with countless 10 miler, 10ks and 5ks on the books. I am in the middle of training for my 3rd full marathon and this one I am doing in honor of my son, I will be running the Air Force Marathon on September 17th and my son will be running the ½ marathon. I love the long runs, I can run for hours and never get tired of the beauty of running. I love the stress release, the bonding with friends, and the me time, it’s my clarity in life.

 

Running has changed my life in every aspect. I truly believe that God put the love for running in my heart when he knew I needed it. Both of my sons are grown and are finding their passion in life and I so badly needed something for myself. I lost my sister to suicide 4 years ago and when I thought I would never find closure and peace within myself I was able to do that through running. I healed through every run, I was able to do nothing but think for sometimes hours at a time while I ran, I was able to cry, laugh and just heal all my hurt and guilt. Running was and is my healing time.

 

Running has brought old friends back into my life and introduced new friends that I have to share all my running moments with. I have the best husband in the world, he is there for almost all my races to cheer me across the finish line. I get to run races with my son when he comes home on leave. I am so thankful that I failed at my first attempt to run, it only made me more determined to succeed at it and in that failure I found one of the best things in life……RUNNING!!!

-Joyce E. Garnet

Posted in Guest Post, having fun running, Jogging, Lessons learned from running, Marathon Runner, Moon Joggers, online running group, Running, running for health, Weekly Results | Comments closed

Where My Feet Have Carried Me

Where My Feet Have Carried Me
By Mark Jordan

At TellabsIf I was writing this prior to May 13th, 2013 I would have described how my feet have carried me on multiple journeys to the bottom of the Grand Canyon, treks up the rivers and on the mountains in Denali National Park, and hikes on the Appalachian Trail, in Glacier National Park, and elsewhere during my Boy Scout years.  Before that life-altering day in May these words would have focused on the memories of early walking dates with my wife-to-be when we waded through rivers, plodded in snowfields, and crawled into caves.  During our nearly 45 years together we have travelled by foot in forest, tundra, desert, mountains, country roads and cities.  My feet have carried me to many wonderful and beautiful places with friends and family.  But as I aged and as my teaching career and growing family needed more and more of my time and energies my feet carried me less and less and my health and weight suffered.

In May of 2013 I found myself in an ambulance.  The person who once ran a six minute mile, a 44 minute 10K, participated in half marathons, coached distance runners in track and trained a state champion cross country team was heading to the hospital with three arteries of the heart more than 95% clogged.  In addition to being overweight I had high blood pressure, diabetes II, and sleep apnea.  The feet that once carried me many miles in many beautiful places were sticking out from beneath a blanket and were cold.

On May 13th, 2013, no steps were taken, my feet carried me nowhere.  I was wheeled into an operating room and received a triple bypass operation.  Recovery began with a very painful, very long night tempered by the permanent presence of my wife.  Two days later she held my arm as we walked from my bed into the hallway.  We progressed to walking from one end of Intensive Care to the other and climbing two flights of stairs.  During the next few weeks at home she guided me to the end of the block, to the school a quarter mile away and then a mile on a wooded trail.  My feet were carrying me farther and farther.  I was becoming obsessed with moving.  I looked forward to my three short walks each day and began to push myself.  My diet changed.  Pounds were shed.  Six weeks after surgery I received permission from my doctor to walk in a 5K.  The permission was based on my wife accompanying me and making sure I did not go too fast.  Fifty-two minutes after the gun we crossed the finish line.  I was proud of our walk and felt as if I had won an Olympic event.  And I had a new shirt.

LPHMIn the last three years my feet have carried me over 10,000 miles.  They have carried me on the course of 5ks, 10ks and half marathons.  I have been in 70 races and earned several age group and walking division medals.  I have far too many T-shirts. My feet have carried me through sore muscles, sweaty clothes and the loss of 80 pounds.  My blood pressure is normal.  My blood sugar is normal.  I no longer need a C-Pap machine to sleep.  It has been a long time since I have felt as well and as good as I now do.  I feel as if I experienced old age in my 40’s and 50’s and finally, in my 60’s, I am enjoying my new found middle age.  But I no longer run or jog.  I have become a walker.

There are many ways to walk.  I can take the dogs out for a long walk.  I can hike.  I can go on a stroll with the family.  I can power walk.  And I can race walk.  My feet have carried me to a new sport, one at which I used to laugh.  I have discovered that race walking is not an easy activity.  There are specific rules for technique.  The form is more restrictive than running.   Walking at a good speed engages and strengthens the muscles, lungs, heart and mind.  It takes discipline and mental fortitude.  Over the years I had lost strength, energy, motivation and determination.  It is good to earn them back.  From my 5K time of 52 minutes I have dropped to 30 minutes and a few seconds.

 

I am grateful to the medical professionals who asked the right questions and ran the right tests to discover and correct my condition.  I am thankful for all the nurses and others who guided me through my recovery.  My children, friends, former students and others have been encouraging and supportive of my journey.  If I had the power to bestow sainthood my wife would be Saint Patti.  My feet have carried me to a new outlook on life.  A grumpy old man has been transformed, by walking, by eating healthy, by prayers of thanksgiving, into someone I can live with and be proud of.

 

My walking may not add one day to my life but it has changed the quality of each day.  I have goals again.  It is easy to get out of bed.  I have become more aware of the lilac, the song of the cardinal and the diverse odors along the trails.   My feet have taken me out of the recliner, away from the refrigerator, beyond the remote and out the door.  My feet have allowed me to race walk past Lincoln’s home with my wife, hike in the Rockies with my children and wrestle with my grandsons.

 

QCSO 2016This morning my daughter drove me to a spot on a rural road eight miles from home.  “See you in a couple hours,” she said and drove away.  The temperature was 86º, dark clouds were rolling in from the west, and a slight breeze enveloped me as I headed home.   For the next 115 minutes my feet carried me past farmhouses and fields, underneath tall oaks, and alongside the Rock River.    I picked up some trash and had to dodge a car and a truck.  I arrived home thirsty, sore and drenched in sweat, but I felt wonderful and blessed that my feet have brought me to this point in my life.   My feet have carried me many places.  I am grateful to all, from family and friends to the Moon Joggers community, who have encouraged and motivated these feet.  May we all continue to celebrate movement and motion and appreciate the wonder of each step.  Be you runner, jogger, or walker may your feet carry you well.

 
About Me:  My wife and I currently live in northern Illinois.  I am a retired teacher that works part time as a math-science tutor at a small university.  My wife was a school-district nurse and now works as a Critical Care nurse.  We spent the bulk of our careers living in rural Alaska where winter walks required a lot of layers to tackle the sub zero temperatures.  We have four grown children and two grandsons.  I am often accompanied on my walks by our pair of Bernese Mountain dogs.

 

Chase the Sun 2Don’t miss out on the BIGGEST savings of the year (up to 40% off) for next year’s main event CHASE THE SUN 2017! Find out the details HERE (discounts expire August 31st).

Posted in Guest Post, having fun running, Jogging, Lessons learned from running, Marathon Runner, Moon Joggers, online running group, Running, running for health, Weekly Results | Comments closed

Where My Feet Have Carried Me

Where Have My Feet Carried Me?

“Left foot, left foot, right foot, right.” My feet have carried me in the morning, at night, through the snow, in the rain, up a hill, down a hill, across a grassy prairie, on a rocky trail, on a Segway, in the heat of day, and in the frigid cold of Minnesota winters.

“Slow feet, quick feet, trick feet, sick feet.” My feet have carried me to run in Florida, Wisconsin, Illinois, and Minnesota for 5Ks, 10Ks, Half Marathons, road races, trail races, obstacle course races, and soon Ragnar races and my marathon mission.

“On the trail and on the street, how many, many feet you meet.” My feet have carried me to an active and healthier life where I get to meet up with others, like you, who’s feet are different; yet the same.

Lisa L“Shoe’d feet, bare feet, walking feet, running feet, neutral feet, pronated feet, hairy feet, pedicured feet, small feet, big feet…how many, many feet you meet.” My feet will continue to carry me to places unknown to meet up with different feet much like your own.
“Left foot, left foot, right foot, right.” My feet will walk, run, jump, climb, bike…until they wear out. Until that day, I will put one foot in front of the other to enjoy the blessings of this earth and live out my life with all of you, who’s feet are different; yet the same.

By: Lisa Ledman, a moon jogger lifer

Credits go to: Dr. Seuss’s The Foot Book (1968)

 

clearancemedals

We have a limited number of amazing medals on CLEARANCE!!! Get your medals NOW!

Posted in Guest Post, having fun running, Jogging, Lessons learned from running, Marathon Runner, Moon Joggers, online running group, Running, running for health, Weekly Results | Comments closed

Where My Feet Have Carried Me

Where My Feet Have Carried Me

By Sarah Satterfield

 

I ran this morning. Zero dark thirty and I, as usual, started my day with a run. It wasn’t always like this. You see, I have never been an athlete. But that all changed in 2007.

 

My most unlikely journey began on Father’s Day, June 17, 2007. My husband, Phalen, rarely had any time off work. This day was an exception and we decided to take advantage of it with a family outing to Disney. We loaded our two little girls into the car early and began our adventure. Peyton turned five that very day. Her baby sister, Emma Claire, was a mere four months.

 

Disney was crowded as it often is during the summer months. The day was hot and the children quickly grew restless. There was something else wrong, though. With Phalen. Phalen never complained of being sick, but something was not quite right. By the middle of the afternoon we were all ready to return home. Again out of the ordinary, Phalen said he needed to lie down. I unloaded the children and got everything together to teach summer session at our local college the next morning.

 

My cell phone rang the following day at about noon. It was Phalen. The manager of a furniture store, he was on his way to court to settle a dispute with a customer. His back was bothering him again. When he was just a few blocks from the courthouse, he decided to make a U-turn and go to the hospital instead.

 

This was the first of several bouts of intense pain. The pain was accompanied by unexplained and alarming surges in his blood pressure. He was in and out of various area hospitals for close to three weeks. Despite heavy medication, the pain would not subside. The ultimate diagnosis was devastating. Phalen—a thirty-five-year-old father of two–had an extremely rare and incurable disease that causes mid-sized arteries in the body to collapse. I carry the name of that disease still to this day on a crumpled post-it note in my wallet—polyarteritis nodosa.

 

The disease ravished Phalen’s body, causing acute kidney failure. The pain he had been experiencing was brought on by the literal breaking apart of his left kidney. The initial prognosis was grim; Phalen was given a 13% chance of survival. Thirty-five years old. The father of two. 13% chance of survival.

 

Treatment with massive doses of steroids ultimately sent Phalen’s disease into remission. But those same steroids caused avascular necrosis. Both femoral heads broke apart, necessitating a bilateral hip replacement. That surgery was followed-up by a heart attack.

 

I watched my husband struggle to stand. I watched him using a walker and insisting that all the blinds be pulled so the neighbors could not see in. I watched from the comfort of my recliner.

 

225687_10150313134683009_2045832_nAnd then I woke up. I came to the realization that I had been blessed with the gift of health, yet was doing absolutely nothing. So I ran. I had never run before, but I ran. And I kept running, because I could. I ran for my husband. I ran for my children. I ran for my father who died way too young after a very short bout with cancer. I ran for those who could not.

 

And I am still running. I wish to “run” this country, and have thirteen states under my Spibelt thus far. I run 5Ks, half marathons, and marathons. I just run. This unlikely athlete—a middle-aged mother of two who one day got off the recliner—is now a nationally ranked triathlete. I have competed in the National Olympic Length Triathlon Championships; I have done Dopey. I have run the mountains of Vermont, and the hills of Utah. I have run through Amish country as well as the Everglades.

 

So where have my feet carried me? My feet have carried me to a place far bigger than I. A place that forced me to look inward and appreciate what I had. May your feet carry you there too.

 

clearancemedals

We have a limited number of amazing medals on CLEARANCE!!! Get your medals NOW!

Posted in Uncategorized | Comments closed

Where My Feet Have Carried Me

Where my feet have carried me
By Melody Olson
IMG_9617My name is Melody and I am a Runner!
That is awesome to even write and I LOVE to be referred to as a runner!
Let me share a bit of my story:
I have an absolute LOVE for Track. I mean, serious LOVE for all things TRACK!
In H.S. (a very long time ago) Track was the only sport I participated in. I was a sprinter and part of two relays, as well. Later on, when I was out of school I ‘jogged’ on and off mostly on weekends. Oh yes, that is what we called it, jogging!
I was married and the children came and running wasn’t my focus. But then, all three of our daughters turned out for Track!!!
I never missed one of their track meets! I love everything about those meets; the sights,sounds and smells bring me right back to those years in H.S. (two of my team-mates went on to be H.S. track coaches!)
IMG_9589I have always been physical, doing some sort of walking or exercise video but, I never really ran for years and years. I was in shape just not running.
When my daughters were all still in school, I was diagnosed not once but, twice with breast cancer. I went through surgery to remove the cancerous breasts and also 16 months of chemotherapy (combining both diagnosis and chemotherapies.) I remember when I was first dx, I was pretty fit at the time doing weights, walking and several exercise DVDs. The Dr. looked me in the eye and said, “you are one very healthy, in shape lady- except you have cancer!”
I continued to walk every chance I got during my treatments. When my energy was up, I would try to walk farther and I never gave up! In fact, the exercise was something I had control over; I didn’t have control over losing my breasts or my hair but, I had control over getting off that couch and getting outside and walking!
As the years went by, I continued walking as my number one daily activity and now, we had become empty nesters, so I could walk longer and farther with no commitments calling me elsewhere! My walks began a healing process for me. My therapy. I could laugh, cry and work through all the changes in our daily lives. (loss of a parent, children moving)
I did numerous 5ks and more than my share of half-marathons but, I still referred to myself as a walker because running, hurt my knees. (early onset arthritis, thank you chemo!)
In January of this year, I decided to cut back on calories and try to lose a bit of weight. The weight started to come off slowly but, it was consistent and this weight I believe really helped my old knees! (no more pain when I tried to run!) Cue the bells, harps, angels and whistles!
13332907_10209109508631488_7508171811198119002_nI started out running from telephone pole to telephone pole, then I’d set another goal eventually adding in some serious intervals.
I now have been able to run complete 5ks with no walking and each time I do one, I am FASTER! Can we say, PR?!
Running and just getting outside has been a huge part of my life and an enormous healing for me. I cannot imagine my life without it!!
By the way, my name is Melody and I AM a RUNNER!
Posted in Uncategorized | Comments closed

Where My Feet Have Carried Me

Where my feet have carried me
By Melody Olson
IMG_9617My name is Melody and I am a Runner!
That is awesome to even write and I LOVE to be referred to as a runner!
Let me share a bit of my story:
I have an absolute LOVE for Track. I mean, serious LOVE for all things TRACK!
In H.S. (a very long time ago) Track was the only sport I participated in. I was a sprinter and part of two relays, as well. Later on, when I was out of school I ‘jogged’ on and off mostly on weekends. Oh yes, that is what we called it, jogging!
I was married and the children came and running wasn’t my focus. But then, all three of our daughters turned out for Track!!!
I never missed one of their track meets! I love everything about those meets; the sights,sounds and smells bring me right back to those years in H.S. (two of my team-mates went on to be H.S. track coaches!)
IMG_9589I have always been physical, doing some sort of walking or exercise video but, I never really ran for years and years. I was in shape just not running.
When my daughters were all still in school, I was diagnosed not once but, twice with breast cancer. I went through surgery to remove the cancerous breasts and also 16 months of chemotherapy (combining both diagnosis and chemotherapies.) I remember when I was first dx, I was pretty fit at the time doing weights, walking and several exercise DVDs. The Dr. looked me in the eye and said, “you are one very healthy, in shape lady- except you have cancer!”
I continued to walk every chance I got during my treatments. When my energy was up, I would try to walk farther and I never gave up! In fact, the exercise was something I had control over; I didn’t have control over losing my breasts or my hair but, I had control over getting off that couch and getting outside and walking!
As the years went by, I continued walking as my number one daily activity and now, we had become empty nesters, so I could walk longer and farther with no commitments calling me elsewhere! My walks began a healing process for me. My therapy. I could laugh, cry and work through all the changes in our daily lives. (loss of a parent, children moving)
I did numerous 5ks and more than my share of half-marathons but, I still referred to myself as a walker because running, hurt my knees. (early onset arthritis, thank you chemo!)
In January of this year, I decided to cut back on calories and try to lose a bit of weight. The weight started to come off slowly but, it was consistent and this weight I believe really helped my old knees! (no more pain when I tried to run!) Cue the bells, harps, angels and whistles!
13332907_10209109508631488_7508171811198119002_nI started out running from telephone pole to telephone pole, then I’d set another goal eventually adding in some serious intervals.
I now have been able to run complete 5ks with no walking and each time I do one, I am FASTER! Can we say, PR?!
Running and just getting outside has been a huge part of my life and an enormous healing for me. I cannot imagine my life without it!!
By the way, my name is Melody and I AM a RUNNER!
Posted in Uncategorized | Comments closed

Where My Feet Have Carried Me

Where My Feet Have Carried Me
By Misty Lamendola

russAs I thought about the theme of “Where My Feet Have Carried Me” it came to me that while my feet have carried me through many things in life already I did not get in to the serious walking until 2015. I had struggled with many health issues through the years and my husband, Russ, faced many health issues of his own. There were times when I thought I was going to lose him. It was during these times that my motivation for staying active went away. I was never considered overweight but I did watch the scale increase in numbers.

As Russ and I talked we knew we had to get healthier in spite of the health challenges we faced. I have a bad knee and I knew running was not for me but as I pushed Russ to sign up for his very first half marathon I wanted to do something as well so I signed up for my first Mile in the Sand. These races were happening the same weekend so we could train at the same time. I started off walking on the road near our home and I remember struggling to even get through a half mile. We found a park nearby where we would go most Saturdays and saw the same people each time. It was a neat experience and I started to get in the habit of improving my pace for one mile walks. In September 2015 I completed my Mile in the Sand with my dad. I did not realize how different being in the sand was and my dad handled it much better than I did. The next day I watched Russ complete his first half marathon and it was inspiring watching so many people participate in the race, some with their own challenges, and others supporting them on the sidelines.

After a doctors visit at the end of September we were faced with information that there was a high probability that I was going to need surgery that would prevent me from ever having my own child. This was heart breaking news and came at a time when we were dealing with a situation where people we thought we could trust turned against us. With both of these happening at the same time it pushed us in to isolation so we turned to our running/walking. I used my walks to spend time with God in the quietness of His creation.

As I continued with testing to confirm I definitely needed the surgery I made the decision to step it up so I would be healthier for my surgery and hopefully not have as long of a recovery. In November I did my first Turkey Trot, which was also only a mile walk. In December I started doing 5K walks. I joined Moon Joggers and absolutely love the community and the virtual races that are offered. The virtual races have given me extra incentive to push forward even when I didn’t want to. On February 1, 2016 I had the surgery and the healing process was difficult for me. I never had major surgery so I was not prepared for the recovery period. I had been so used to walking every weekend that when I couldn’t I started to get depressed.

Towards mid-March I tried my first mile, which was exhausting. In early April I successfully complete my first 5K since my surgery. The pace was slower than I wanted but I was thrilled to finally be able to go the distance. In May we found a new place to race and train. On May 20th I had my best 5K since the surgery, which was only 2 minutes from my best time since I started doing 5Ks. I am well on my way to recovery and look forward to getting even stronger and faster.

Life gives us many challenges. Walking helps me to quiet myself before God and get a clearer focus on what to do next. I love my walks and I love that I am able to watch my husband do his running. Together we are able to support and encourage each other to be healthier. Later this year I will be doing the Mile in the Sand again and the next day while Russ does the half marathon I will be doing a 5K. This will be my first non-virtual 5K race. I am looking forward to it.

 

About me: My name is Misty Lamendola and I am forty years old. I have lived in New Jersey most of my life with the exception of a couple years when I lived in California. I married Russ in May 2000. My full time job involves clinical trials but I have a Masters Degree in Christian Counseling, which I use to work with people in ministry. I enjoy walking while my husband runs and spending weekends at the park. In the summer I enjoy going to the drive-in with Russ to watch movies under the stars.

Posted in Uncategorized | Comments closed

Where My Feet Have Taken Me

Where My Feet Have Taken Me
By Eric Clifford
 
Whose woods these are I think I know.  His house is in the village though; He will not see me stopping here  To watch his woods fill up with snow.   
 
My little horse must think it queer  To stop without a farmhouse near  Between the woods and frozen lake  The darkest evening of the year.   
 
He gives his harness bells a shake  To ask if there is some mistake.  The only other sound’s the sweep  Of easy wind and downy flake.   
 
The woods are lovely, dark and deep,  But I have promises to keep,  And miles to go before I sleep,  And miles to go before I sleep.
 
 
  1973663_10202824666152826_4175995069940281513_o   
 

I have found that my runs have a lot in common with this poem. I have always thought of running as a microcosm of life; There are highs and lows, great joy and, great pain. A constant struggle to not only endure but to become the best you can be. I often run through the woods by my house thinking of times long ago when there wasn’t a four lane road just on the other side of the river. Fish were plentiful in it and not contaminated. I’m sorry but when they say you can eat the fish but no more than one pound a month because of the toxins… that’s just not good to me. 

  
     There are so many THINGS that just takeover our lives and the drain it puts on us mentally and physically can at times be overwhelming. You struggle to get through the day. The week. Till the next check wondering how you can make it to the other side without losing it. I used to play football. It worked well. I could go beat the crap out of someone and not get in trouble for it. I studied martial arts. Another good choice. But I stopped that when I had my nose broken (for the third time in my life) and it lined it back up so I could breathe normally again. Cheaper than surgery anyway. But with all my friends not wanting to do anything other than golf on occasion and me, by the third hole I’m bored out of my mind, I needed something else to do. On your mark! Maybe I’ll try running. Get set! Woods are a couple blocks away, I’ve got shoes… Go! Talk about aggravating. I had been so used to running fast for short distances that by a half mile I was gassed. My side hurt. I didn’t think there was enough air outside and my legs felt like jelly. One sad sorry son of bitch walked home and was pissed for the next few days thinking; What the hell is wrong with me? Ok, let me think about this. I ran track for Oak Park as a kid… What did I do then? 
 
     I put together a plan. It’s a mile from here through the woods to River Road. That’s two round trip. Ok, first thing is to make that distance. Just keep moving forward running as much as possible not as fast as possible. Soon I was running the whole distance and feeling good. Then I worked on speed and soon realized running two miles in less than fifteen minutes wasn’t doing it for me. My next challenge, make this more interesting.
 
    I thought running the way I had been, straight and fast was like riding a motorcycle; Anybody can go straight but can you turn? I started running down the trail and then would jump into the tree line running around, jumping over, ducking under trees and branches until I really couldn’t breathe anymore then, I would get back on the trail and catch my breath and do it all again. This was a great workout. But I had to run farther. It was two miles through the woods to a grove where the was a steep and long hill that is used for sledding. Run to there, run the hill a few times and head back home. Now I had three good runs to do; One from two to five miles on a trail. One that went off trail into the tree line and one that was five mile plus some hill climbs. 
 
    All was going well but we were moving. Started looking for a house and found the one we live in now. The process took a while and my runs were taking a hit because of it. Then we bought the home and with all the work I was doing my runs stopped. Not as bad as you might think because I could ride my bike to work most of the time so that was about 6.5 miles each way so I was staying in decent condition. Then one cold morning while driving to work a car crossed the double yellow line and hit me head on. 
 
    One month off work. Three months of therapy. I had a bruise the shape of my seatbelt (across my chest and back across my waste) for a couple weeks. Well, I didn’t get back to working out for a long time. Even after I felt better I just didn’t do it. My weight went up to 220 pounds. I’m 5’9″, that is not a good look for me let alone being able to do things without becoming exhausted. One day I was sitting on the edge of the bed and bent over to tie my shoes and it felt like my head was going to explode. I’m not kidding. The pressure made my eyes hurt. I decided that I was going to get in shape starting the next day. Many of you know that part of the story from the last time I wrote one of these. I’ve run many races since then. 5Ks, 8Ks, 10 milers, several halfs’ and about 12-13 marathons. I was supposed to run another marathon this weekend but my left thigh has swollen 1 1/2 – 2 inches bigger than my right because of an IT Band issue I’ve been dealing with for a while now. So, as in life there are ups and downs. Carefree times and major setbacks but it’s all about getting your feet on the floor and moving them forward. Always forward.
 
    The woods are lovely, dark and deep,  But I have promises to keep,  And miles to go before I sleep.
 
 
 
 
 

**All walkers and runners are invited to join Moon Joggers! If  you have not signed up for MERCURY RISING  (one of the paid registration options) do so now and you’ll be able to save 25% on our virtual races in 2016! (Use code MILLIONMILES to save 25% on MERCURY RISING).

 

Posted in Guest Post, having fun running, Jogging, Lessons learned from running, Marathon Runner, Moon Joggers, online running group, Running, running for health, Weekly Results | Comments closed

Where My Feet Have Carried Me

Where My Feet Have Carried Me
By Barbara Corn

13274981_1061726320559173_1435521120_oI have run off and on since high school. Usually it was for fitness and the aerobic part of my training. My feet also ski, rollerblade, dive, swim , bike. You name it I do it. I started to up the events in 2014. I did my first sprint triathlon, which I loved. I incorporate yoga into training so I don’t get injured like other people do.

My hands have developed osteoarthritis and I’ve had to have several knuckles replaced. I’ve noticed some changes in my toes as of late . I’m gonna keep on plugging in until I can’t run and then I will bike, kayak, swim .

13271903_1061725317225940_1882933447_oThis year my new events are longer bike rides for charities, swim to the moon, a 3 mile swim, and an Olympic triathalon. In January I finished a full marathon in Disney. That was the first and last. Half marathons or less are optimum for me. I’m not fast but I come in middle of pack. I’m ok with that. My feet are wonderful to do all this and they deserve my applause. Feet don’t fail me now. Keep on keeping on!

13282572_1061725480559257_1958033625_o

Posted in Guest Post, having fun running, Jogging, Lessons learned from running, Marathon Runner, Moon Joggers, online running group, Running, running for health, Weekly Results | Comments closed

The Importance of Cross Training as a Runner

The Importance of Cross Training as a Runner
By Shawn Webb

shawn2I have been a personal trainer for about 8 years and have trained many runners.  I am a runner and have friends and family members who are also avid runners. My passion is in weightlifting, but I am a firm believer in rotating between different forms of exercise to0.

I want to paint a picture for you…has this happened to you?  It’s 6 in the morning and your alarm rings.  You sluggishly get out of bed, grab your running shoes, and stretch.  You find your headphones and blast your favorite playlist.  You get out the door and start running your typical route. As you start to warm up you hit that runner’s high and feel like you can run forever.  Then it happens–you hit a wall.  Your knee, foot, or (enter your own injury here) starts to hurt. Now you are in survival mode and just want to see your house come into sight. You’re frustrated, hurting, and your goals have to take a backseat until you can recover.

Disclaimer:  This is not everyone’s experience-just a common use case that I have come across.

How do I prevent nagging injuries?  How do I improve my time in my races?  Why am I not losing a lot of fat even though I am a consistent runner?  Why am I so sore after a run?  Why do I keep hitting that runner’s wall?  I do not have time to run long distances every day so how to I build endurance?  Why do I have such low energy? How do I train for this marathon I just signed up for?

Do you ever ask yourself any of those questions or others not mentioned?  The solution to just about all of these questions is CROSS TRAINING.

shawnWhat is cross training? It is training in two or more sports in order to improve fitness and performance, especially in a main sport. Adding resistance(strength) training to a running regimen is considered a form of cross training.

Let me go over the benefits of implementing Cross Training into your routine:

  1. Decrease Injury: Many runners have a goal to run farther and/or faster. A common occurrence is over training syndrome.  Instead of cross training, a lot of people will run too much and will experience common injuries: stress fractures, plantar fasciitis, tendinitis, burning muscle tissue, and joint pain.  By implementing cross training into your routine you will strengthen your muscles and tendons, increase joint mobility, improve proprioception and balance, and avoid the damaging effects of doing the same thing over and over.
  1. Increase Aerobic Fitness: Due to the pounding on your joints, even the most gifted runners can handle no more than about 15 hours of running per week. Athletes that implement non-impact endurance training into their routine can usually double the amount of aerobic exercise than they would get from just strictly running.  Some examples would be swimming and cycling.  This also decreases your chances of injury by decreasing all the impact your joints take from running only. Getting fit faster.
  1. More Power:  Another benefit of adding strength training is increased stride power. This translates into greater stride length/reduced ground contact time and consequently faster race times. Adding resistance training will strengthen the tendons and muscles surrounding your joints.  You will maintain lean muscle tissue, which will combat the ability to burn fat off your body.  Great examples of strength training are plyometrics, sprints, weight training, circuit training, HIIT.
  1. Greater Efficiency:  Dynamic flexibility is the ability to perform sports movements, such as running, with minimal internal resistance from your own muscles and joints.  Performing dynamic stretching enhances dynamic flexibility by mimicking the way your muscles and connective tissues actually stretch during running.  A great example of a dynamic stretch is giant walking lunges.  This will help decrease injury as well.  This will make your muscles and joints more efficient in your running therefore decreasing your chances of over work and injury.
  1. Active Recovery:  By performing workouts between runs, you will actually help your body recover faster than the runners who just rest between long runs. You will become fitter faster, decrease soreness time, and increase mobility and flexibility.  

These are just a few benefits. Cross training has other benefits that won’t be covered in this article are enhanced motivation, it keeps your desire for running high; enhances your ability to participate in other endurance sports so you can have fun; rejuvenating; in pregnant women,  it will help postpartum recovery and help you stay fit until the time of the birth.

I offer a cross training program for runners. It will take out all the guess work and set up a plan that will work for your specific goals Cross training will not benefit your running alone,but it will benefit your overall health and fitness.

Visit my website today and get signed up now!  I will to donate 25% of your payment to the Fight Against Childhood Obesity.

 

 

**All walkers and runners are invited to join Moon Joggers! If  you have not signed up for MERCURY RISING  (one of the paid registration options) do so now and you’ll be able to save 25% on our virtual races in 2016! (Use code MILLIONMILES to save 25% on MERCURY RISING).

clearancemedals

Please use the sharing buttons below to invite your friends to help us reach our goal!

Posted in Guest Post, having fun running, Jogging, Lessons learned from running, Marathon Runner, Moon Joggers, online running group, Running, running for health, Weekly Results | Tagged , , , , | Comments closed